citymaus:

Rush hour in San Francisco on Market St. is looking a bit like Copenhagen.
@greenlaneproject. 04.06.14.
might be due to the MUNI sickout? slightly..
market street should be closed to cars already. although it would make driving in that area even more confusing in the rare case that you would be driving there.
**that car is in the bike box.

love it. 

citymaus:

Rush hour in San Francisco on Market St. is looking a bit like Copenhagen.

@greenlaneproject. 04.06.14.

might be due to the MUNI sickout? slightly..

market street should be closed to cars already. although it would make driving in that area even more confusing in the rare case that you would be driving there.

**that car is in the bike box.

love it. 

The Real Rules of Engagement on the Subways of Europe

Thought this was fun. In DC, the metro system I’m most familiar with, you’re mostly expected to be silent, unless it’s a weekend night; it’s ok to leave your Express Newspaper lying around for the next rider to pick up; do not ever eat on the train; and only stand on the left side if the escalator if you want to be hated (seriously, a lot of the stations are like 10 stories underground, so unless you want to waste 5 minutes on an escalator you walk). 

thisbigcity:

atlurbanist:

I’ll take this a step further and say that if you have a significant number of these unsafe streets, you designed the entirety of your urban place wrong. How did we end up with so many of these strange, car-dependent things called “arterial roads” adjacent to homes and businesses? That’s a 20th-century placemaking fail of epic proportions.
Fred Kent, founder of Project for Public Spaces, has a great quote:

“If you plan cities for cars and traffic, you get cars and traffic. If you plan for people and places, you get people and places.”

If you’re interested in hearing from a guy who knows a lot about the origin of sprawling, car-centric places, I recommend heading to Atlanta’s Manuel’s Tavern this Thursday night where author Ben Ross will be speaking.
Above graphic from Strong Towns

Truth.

Common problem when the streets are too wide in residential neighborhoods. I’ll be honest, driving fast on those wide, twisty subdivision roads with almost no stop signs is fun, if dangerous. 

thisbigcity:

atlurbanist:

I’ll take this a step further and say that if you have a significant number of these unsafe streets, you designed the entirety of your urban place wrong. How did we end up with so many of these strange, car-dependent things called “arterial roads” adjacent to homes and businesses? That’s a 20th-century placemaking fail of epic proportions.

Fred Kent, founder of Project for Public Spaces, has a great quote:

“If you plan cities for cars and traffic, you get cars and traffic. If you plan for people and places, you get people and places.”

If you’re interested in hearing from a guy who knows a lot about the origin of sprawling, car-centric places, I recommend heading to Atlanta’s Manuel’s Tavern this Thursday night where author Ben Ross will be speaking.

Above graphic from Strong Towns

Truth.

Common problem when the streets are too wide in residential neighborhoods. I’ll be honest, driving fast on those wide, twisty subdivision roads with almost no stop signs is fun, if dangerous. 

In order to supply the last mile trips, to connect with the mass transportation system TransMilenio, to efficiently generate modal shift, to promote non-polluting means of transport, and to take good care of public health, Bogota has finally decided to move forwards with the implementation of its public-use bicycle program.

Andres Jara Moreno on the many, many benefits of urban cycle hire schemes.  (via thisbigcity)

Love it. One day I’ll make it back to Colombia. 

urbnist:

I’m sorry. But is that a street facing McDonald’s with a walk-thru? Well, yes. Yes, it is indeed a street facing McDonald’s with walk-thru. Demand better urbanism, folks. Because, as evidenced here, anything is possible. (at Savannah Georgia USA)

I like. I don’t even eat McDonald’s unless I’m travelling, but this is cool. 

urbnist:

I’m sorry. But is that a street facing McDonald’s with a walk-thru? Well, yes. Yes, it is indeed a street facing McDonald’s with walk-thru. Demand better urbanism, folks. Because, as evidenced here, anything is possible. (at Savannah Georgia USA)

I like. I don’t even eat McDonald’s unless I’m travelling, but this is cool.