america-wakiewakie:

Tennessee Passes Mind-Boggling Ban On Rapid Bus Transit | Wired 
Tennessee lawmakers overwhelmingly voted in favor a bill that bans the construction of bus rapid transit (BRT) anywhere in the state.
The impetus for the vote was a proposal to build a $174 million BRT system in Nashville called The Amp, which would’ve ran on a 7.1 mile route and served rapidly growing neighborhoods across the city. There’s a more detailed summary of the project over at The Tennessean.
Although BRT has been shown to revitalize economies and reduce congestion, opponents of The Amp voiced concerns about the safety of unloading bus passengers along roadways and whether private land would be used to build dedicated bus lanes.
After the vote, Amp opponents revealed that the conservative group Americans for Prosperity, founded with the support of brothers Charles and David Koch, had lobbied in favor of the bus ban.
The legislation is startlingly specific: Senate Bill 2243 forbids “constructing, maintaining or operating any bus rapid transit system.”
The Senate version of the BRT ban also forbids buses from “loading or discharging passengers at any point within the boundary lines of a state highway or state highway right-of-way not adjacent to the right-hand, lateral curb line.” Though the House struck that provision and sent revised legislation back to the Senate, it would still require special approval from the Tennessee Department of Transportation and local government bodies.
It’s a hard line, and an unusual one.
Normally, the easiest way to kill a public transit project is to pull its funding. Alabama, Arizona, Hawaii and Utah all forbid state funding for public transit systems, for instance, but even that isn’t foolproof: Utah’s taken on some major commuter rail expansions lately, and Phoenix uses county tax revenues to pay for its transit system.
Voters in Arlington, TX famously voted against public transit funding for decades, and an acrimonious debate in Cincinnati almost derailed a streetcar project, but both those cities now have service.
A formal ban on BRT is about the only way that Tennessee could ensure that The Amp didn’t get built as intended. Already, the project seems to be watered down. Nashville’s mayor—a proponent of the project—has ordered a study that would redesign the system to avoid using dedicated lanes (PDF).
Now, drivers in Nashville can look forward to increased traffic and longer commutes. But at least those pesky buses won’t be in the way.
(Photo Credit: Amp Yes)

Conservatives’ hatred of everything that is good continues to boggle my mind. 

america-wakiewakie:

Tennessee Passes Mind-Boggling Ban On Rapid Bus Transit | Wired 

Tennessee lawmakers overwhelmingly voted in favor a bill that bans the construction of bus rapid transit (BRT) anywhere in the state.

The impetus for the vote was a proposal to build a $174 million BRT system in Nashville called The Amp, which would’ve ran on a 7.1 mile route and served rapidly growing neighborhoods across the city. There’s a more detailed summary of the project over at The Tennessean.

Although BRT has been shown to revitalize economies and reduce congestion, opponents of The Amp voiced concerns about the safety of unloading bus passengers along roadways and whether private land would be used to build dedicated bus lanes.

After the vote, Amp opponents revealed that the conservative group Americans for Prosperity, founded with the support of brothers Charles and David Koch, had lobbied in favor of the bus ban.

The legislation is startlingly specific: Senate Bill 2243 forbids “constructing, maintaining or operating any bus rapid transit system.”

The Senate version of the BRT ban also forbids buses from “loading or discharging passengers at any point within the boundary lines of a state highway or state highway right-of-way not adjacent to the right-hand, lateral curb line.” Though the House struck that provision and sent revised legislation back to the Senate, it would still require special approval from the Tennessee Department of Transportation and local government bodies.

It’s a hard line, and an unusual one.

Normally, the easiest way to kill a public transit project is to pull its funding. Alabama, Arizona, Hawaii and Utah all forbid state funding for public transit systems, for instance, but even that isn’t foolproof: Utah’s taken on some major commuter rail expansions lately, and Phoenix uses county tax revenues to pay for its transit system.

Voters in Arlington, TX famously voted against public transit funding for decades, and an acrimonious debate in Cincinnati almost derailed a streetcar project, but both those cities now have service.

A formal ban on BRT is about the only way that Tennessee could ensure that The Amp didn’t get built as intended. Already, the project seems to be watered down. Nashville’s mayor—a proponent of the project—has ordered a study that would redesign the system to avoid using dedicated lanes (PDF).

Now, drivers in Nashville can look forward to increased traffic and longer commutes. But at least those pesky buses won’t be in the way.

(Photo Credit: Amp Yes)

Conservatives’ hatred of everything that is good continues to boggle my mind. 

theatlanticcities:


This week officials in Bolivia gave a public preview of the country’s new gondola system, and it was impressive: With a length of nearly 7 miles threading through 11 stations, the cloud-kissing people-mover is set to become to world’s largest network of urban ropeways.
Bolivians piled into the system’s globular, cherry-red pods to take a giddy ride over the labyrinthine streets of La Paz. This ropeway is one of three planned for the network, which is being built by Austria’s Doppelmayr Garaventa Group. The hope is that when it’s completed later this year, the gondolas will ease some of the terrible congestion in the country’s urban areas. Together, the cars are estimated to be able to carry up to 18,000 people an hour.

-Bolivia Deploys the World’s Largest System of Cable Cars
[Image: Reuters]

i want to ride this. that”s amazing

theatlanticcities:

This week officials in Bolivia gave a public preview of the country’s new gondola system, and it was impressive: With a length of nearly 7 miles threading through 11 stations, the cloud-kissing people-mover is set to become to world’s largest network of urban ropeways.

Bolivians piled into the system’s globular, cherry-red pods to take a giddy ride over the labyrinthine streets of La Paz. This ropeway is one of three planned for the network, which is being built by Austria’s Doppelmayr Garaventa Group. The hope is that when it’s completed later this year, the gondolas will ease some of the terrible congestion in the country’s urban areas. Together, the cars are estimated to be able to carry up to 18,000 people an hour.

-Bolivia Deploys the World’s Largest System of Cable Cars

[Image: Reuters]

i want to ride this. that”s amazing

nycopendata:

While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning's Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 
This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.
View DCP’s Population Projections.
Learn more about how the Department of City Planning estimates population. 
Visit the NYC Open Data portal.

That’s a lot of people. Even SF and DC have population densities less than that of Queens.

nycopendata:

While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning's Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 

This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.

View DCP’s Population Projections.

Learn more about how the Department of City Planning estimates population. 

Visit the NYC Open Data portal.

That’s a lot of people. Even SF and DC have population densities less than that of Queens.

thisbigcity:

“Movebybike will transport anything up to around 660 pounds courtesy a fleet of bike trailers,” writes Feargus O’Sullivan for The Atlantic Cities. “Initially a small project run by enthusiasts, the company expanded this year from its home base in Malmö to Stockholm and Gothenburg, thus covering Sweden’s three largest cities. Not only is the company greener than the alternative, it’s also faster and potentially cheaper.”
Read more here.

I love Scandinavia 
Zoom Info
thisbigcity:

“Movebybike will transport anything up to around 660 pounds courtesy a fleet of bike trailers,” writes Feargus O’Sullivan for The Atlantic Cities. “Initially a small project run by enthusiasts, the company expanded this year from its home base in Malmö to Stockholm and Gothenburg, thus covering Sweden’s three largest cities. Not only is the company greener than the alternative, it’s also faster and potentially cheaper.”
Read more here.

I love Scandinavia 
Zoom Info

thisbigcity:

Movebybike will transport anything up to around 660 pounds courtesy a fleet of bike trailers,” writes Feargus O’Sullivan for The Atlantic Cities. “Initially a small project run by enthusiasts, the company expanded this year from its home base in Malmö to Stockholm and Gothenburg, thus covering Sweden’s three largest cities. Not only is the company greener than the alternative, it’s also faster and potentially cheaper.”

Read more here.

I love Scandinavia 

Basketball with dinner. Chickpeas, tomatos, kale and polenta stew. So flavorful.

Basketball with dinner. Chickpeas, tomatos, kale and polenta stew. So flavorful.

thisbigcity:

And yet they have extremely low rates of cycling related head injuries. Meanwhile, the US is among those countries that lead in both wearing helmets and head injuries. One of the main differences? Serious investments in cycling infrastructure, much of which is segregated or protected from auto traffic. 
If you have any #citydata you’d like to share then send it our way! 

If you have good infrastructure cycling is safe. If you don’t then you will get hit by a reckless driver and be blamed. 

thisbigcity:

And yet they have extremely low rates of cycling related head injuries. Meanwhile, the US is among those countries that lead in both wearing helmets and head injuries. One of the main differences? Serious investments in cycling infrastructure, much of which is segregated or protected from auto traffic. 

If you have any #citydata you’d like to share then send it our way

If you have good infrastructure cycling is safe. If you don’t then you will get hit by a reckless driver and be blamed.