america-wakiewakie:

Tennessee Passes Mind-Boggling Ban On Rapid Bus Transit | Wired 
Tennessee lawmakers overwhelmingly voted in favor a bill that bans the construction of bus rapid transit (BRT) anywhere in the state.
The impetus for the vote was a proposal to build a $174 million BRT system in Nashville called The Amp, which would’ve ran on a 7.1 mile route and served rapidly growing neighborhoods across the city. There’s a more detailed summary of the project over at The Tennessean.
Although BRT has been shown to revitalize economies and reduce congestion, opponents of The Amp voiced concerns about the safety of unloading bus passengers along roadways and whether private land would be used to build dedicated bus lanes.
After the vote, Amp opponents revealed that the conservative group Americans for Prosperity, founded with the support of brothers Charles and David Koch, had lobbied in favor of the bus ban.
The legislation is startlingly specific: Senate Bill 2243 forbids “constructing, maintaining or operating any bus rapid transit system.”
The Senate version of the BRT ban also forbids buses from “loading or discharging passengers at any point within the boundary lines of a state highway or state highway right-of-way not adjacent to the right-hand, lateral curb line.” Though the House struck that provision and sent revised legislation back to the Senate, it would still require special approval from the Tennessee Department of Transportation and local government bodies.
It’s a hard line, and an unusual one.
Normally, the easiest way to kill a public transit project is to pull its funding. Alabama, Arizona, Hawaii and Utah all forbid state funding for public transit systems, for instance, but even that isn’t foolproof: Utah’s taken on some major commuter rail expansions lately, and Phoenix uses county tax revenues to pay for its transit system.
Voters in Arlington, TX famously voted against public transit funding for decades, and an acrimonious debate in Cincinnati almost derailed a streetcar project, but both those cities now have service.
A formal ban on BRT is about the only way that Tennessee could ensure that The Amp didn’t get built as intended. Already, the project seems to be watered down. Nashville’s mayor—a proponent of the project—has ordered a study that would redesign the system to avoid using dedicated lanes (PDF).
Now, drivers in Nashville can look forward to increased traffic and longer commutes. But at least those pesky buses won’t be in the way.
(Photo Credit: Amp Yes)

Conservatives’ hatred of everything that is good continues to boggle my mind. 

america-wakiewakie:

Tennessee Passes Mind-Boggling Ban On Rapid Bus Transit | Wired 

Tennessee lawmakers overwhelmingly voted in favor a bill that bans the construction of bus rapid transit (BRT) anywhere in the state.

The impetus for the vote was a proposal to build a $174 million BRT system in Nashville called The Amp, which would’ve ran on a 7.1 mile route and served rapidly growing neighborhoods across the city. There’s a more detailed summary of the project over at The Tennessean.

Although BRT has been shown to revitalize economies and reduce congestion, opponents of The Amp voiced concerns about the safety of unloading bus passengers along roadways and whether private land would be used to build dedicated bus lanes.

After the vote, Amp opponents revealed that the conservative group Americans for Prosperity, founded with the support of brothers Charles and David Koch, had lobbied in favor of the bus ban.

The legislation is startlingly specific: Senate Bill 2243 forbids “constructing, maintaining or operating any bus rapid transit system.”

The Senate version of the BRT ban also forbids buses from “loading or discharging passengers at any point within the boundary lines of a state highway or state highway right-of-way not adjacent to the right-hand, lateral curb line.” Though the House struck that provision and sent revised legislation back to the Senate, it would still require special approval from the Tennessee Department of Transportation and local government bodies.

It’s a hard line, and an unusual one.

Normally, the easiest way to kill a public transit project is to pull its funding. Alabama, Arizona, Hawaii and Utah all forbid state funding for public transit systems, for instance, but even that isn’t foolproof: Utah’s taken on some major commuter rail expansions lately, and Phoenix uses county tax revenues to pay for its transit system.

Voters in Arlington, TX famously voted against public transit funding for decades, and an acrimonious debate in Cincinnati almost derailed a streetcar project, but both those cities now have service.

A formal ban on BRT is about the only way that Tennessee could ensure that The Amp didn’t get built as intended. Already, the project seems to be watered down. Nashville’s mayor—a proponent of the project—has ordered a study that would redesign the system to avoid using dedicated lanes (PDF).

Now, drivers in Nashville can look forward to increased traffic and longer commutes. But at least those pesky buses won’t be in the way.

(Photo Credit: Amp Yes)

Conservatives’ hatred of everything that is good continues to boggle my mind. 

theatlanticcities:


This week officials in Bolivia gave a public preview of the country’s new gondola system, and it was impressive: With a length of nearly 7 miles threading through 11 stations, the cloud-kissing people-mover is set to become to world’s largest network of urban ropeways.
Bolivians piled into the system’s globular, cherry-red pods to take a giddy ride over the labyrinthine streets of La Paz. This ropeway is one of three planned for the network, which is being built by Austria’s Doppelmayr Garaventa Group. The hope is that when it’s completed later this year, the gondolas will ease some of the terrible congestion in the country’s urban areas. Together, the cars are estimated to be able to carry up to 18,000 people an hour.

-Bolivia Deploys the World’s Largest System of Cable Cars
[Image: Reuters]

i want to ride this. that”s amazing

theatlanticcities:

This week officials in Bolivia gave a public preview of the country’s new gondola system, and it was impressive: With a length of nearly 7 miles threading through 11 stations, the cloud-kissing people-mover is set to become to world’s largest network of urban ropeways.

Bolivians piled into the system’s globular, cherry-red pods to take a giddy ride over the labyrinthine streets of La Paz. This ropeway is one of three planned for the network, which is being built by Austria’s Doppelmayr Garaventa Group. The hope is that when it’s completed later this year, the gondolas will ease some of the terrible congestion in the country’s urban areas. Together, the cars are estimated to be able to carry up to 18,000 people an hour.

-Bolivia Deploys the World’s Largest System of Cable Cars

[Image: Reuters]

i want to ride this. that”s amazing

massurban:

Streetsblog:
"Will America’s Surging Number of Seniors Have Safe Streets to Be Active?
Angie Schmitt. Feb 11, 2014
America is aging. But our communities are poorly designed for older people.
Some cities are trying to prepare for the coming demographic changes with programs like Safe Routes for Seniors, writes Louise McGrody at Rails to Trails. But McGrody says it’s still unclear whether aging baby boomers will be able to integrate healthy activity into their lives, because of the way our streets are designed. And that has huge implications for public health:”
Photo:Steve, 88, of Yuma, Arizona is still able to ride his trike to the store. Rails to Trails



Don’t think Grandma has the best reaction times and think she should stop driving? Well if there’s good transit and safe bike paths then maybe the transition will be easier. 

massurban:

Streetsblog:

"Will America’s Surging Number of Seniors Have Safe Streets to Be Active?

Angie Schmitt. Feb 11, 2014

America is aging. But our communities are poorly designed for older people.

Some cities are trying to prepare for the coming demographic changes with programs like Safe Routes for Seniors, writes Louise McGrody at Rails to Trails. But McGrody says it’s still unclear whether aging baby boomers will be able to integrate healthy activity into their lives, because of the way our streets are designed. And that has huge implications for public health:”

Photo:Steve, 88, of Yuma, Arizona is still able to ride his trike to the store. Rails to Trails

Don’t think Grandma has the best reaction times and think she should stop driving? Well if there’s good transit and safe bike paths then maybe the transition will be easier. 

Bike share has played a big part in recent revitalization in Minneapolis, Chicago, and elsewhere, where it has filled in a gap in local transportation networks. B-cycle wants to ensure this benefit comes to Kansas City’s neighborhoods.

Sarah Shipley on plans to transform Kansas City into one of the most cycleable cities in the US. (via thisbigcity)

Human Transit: santiago: a low-tech approach to fast exits from a subway station

This is awesome. All they did was add some gates and some personnel to tell people they couldn’t go that way and boom… efficiency. 

I’ve never understood how people who commute to the same place regularly, aren’t smart enough to know which car they need to be on to exit quickly. I get that occasionally you’re running to catch the train so you just get on at the door you get to first or you’re with friends so you don’t sit in the car that’s most convenient for you, but in general after 3-4 trips you should know which car to be on. 

brandondonnelly:

Want to know how the Dutch design their intersections so that they’re friendly for cyclists? Then check out this video. It’s amazing what you can achieve when you actually care about something and you put thought and intent into it.

I want.

thisbigcity:

Is BRT the way forward for cities facing severe budget constraints? Cleveland’s Euclid Ave corridor, complete with streetscape improvements and a new BRT line, makes the case that it just might be. 
If you have your own #citydata submission you’d like to see included in our series, then send it our way!

Transit works.

thisbigcity:

Is BRT the way forward for cities facing severe budget constraints? Cleveland’s Euclid Ave corridor, complete with streetscape improvements and a new BRT line, makes the case that it just might be. 

If you have your own #citydata submission you’d like to see included in our series, then send it our way!

Transit works.

urbanewords:

San Francisco transit stops — translated into the things you would actually expect at the station, other than its pure name. Try and guess the station.
I mean, come on, since when do you actually choose a station just for its name? At Urbane, our goal is to debunk the social mysteries of cities.
You can get a printed version of this map by clicking on the image!

urbanewords:

San Francisco transit stops — translated into the things you would actually expect at the station, other than its pure name. Try and guess the station.

I mean, come on, since when do you actually choose a station just for its name? At Urbane, our goal is to debunk the social mysteries of cities.

You can get a printed version of this map by clicking on the image!

spacehyu:

Reasons for New Lines
One of the main arguments for this plan is that  the density of subway lines in Seoul should be higher. The density of rail in Seoul is lower than in London, Paris and Tokyo. Besides that, the model share of subway is (only) 36 % (bus 28 %, private vehicles 31 % and 5% others). This measure aims to increase the modal share of public transport to 75%. City officials also said that 38% of Seoul’s area have poor public transport systems.
The Wirye-Line is going to be a surface tram

I kind of love surface trams despite the fact that they take up aboveground space. You just hop on and off without having to deal with stairs (hello DC metro’s broken escalators)
Zoom Info
spacehyu:

Reasons for New Lines
One of the main arguments for this plan is that  the density of subway lines in Seoul should be higher. The density of rail in Seoul is lower than in London, Paris and Tokyo. Besides that, the model share of subway is (only) 36 % (bus 28 %, private vehicles 31 % and 5% others). This measure aims to increase the modal share of public transport to 75%. City officials also said that 38% of Seoul’s area have poor public transport systems.
The Wirye-Line is going to be a surface tram

I kind of love surface trams despite the fact that they take up aboveground space. You just hop on and off without having to deal with stairs (hello DC metro’s broken escalators)
Zoom Info

spacehyu:

Reasons for New Lines

One of the main arguments for this plan is that  the density of subway lines in Seoul should be higher. The density of rail in Seoul is lower than in London, Paris and Tokyo. Besides that, the model share of subway is (only) 36 % (bus 28 %, private vehicles 31 % and 5% others). This measure aims to increase the modal share of public transport to 75%. City officials also said that 38% of Seoul’s area have poor public transport systems.

The Wirye-Line is going to be a surface tram

I kind of love surface trams despite the fact that they take up aboveground space. You just hop on and off without having to deal with stairs (hello DC metro’s broken escalators)

Free Parking: At What Cost?

When they built that Target/Best Buy complex in DC (still the city’s only Target) they built a large underground parking facility. Parking there isn’t free, but at $1.50 an hour it’s relatively low cost. However, the city has found that the parking lot is never very crowded. Why? There’s a metro station literally in front of the building, several major bus routes stop in front of it, it’s in an area where lots of people bike and there is lots of housing within walking distance.
Contrast that with where I live now, where all the big box stores (and the mall) are all clustered together north of the freeway where NO ONE lives. You have to drive there. Near campus-town and near downtown is super bikeable and even walkable, but good luck going shopping on your bike.  

Free Parking: At What Cost?

When they built that Target/Best Buy complex in DC (still the city’s only Target) they built a large underground parking facility. Parking there isn’t free, but at $1.50 an hour it’s relatively low cost. However, the city has found that the parking lot is never very crowded. Why? There’s a metro station literally in front of the building, several major bus routes stop in front of it, it’s in an area where lots of people bike and there is lots of housing within walking distance.

Contrast that with where I live now, where all the big box stores (and the mall) are all clustered together north of the freeway where NO ONE lives. You have to drive there. Near campus-town and near downtown is super bikeable and even walkable, but good luck going shopping on your bike.